Same week appointments usually available. Call to schedule an appointment.

Phone

P. 610-734-0790
F. 610-352-1015

       

ADDRESS

Riddle Health Memorial Hospital
1068 W Baltimore Pike, HCC II Suite 2302
Media, PA 19063

Abdominal Pain Syndrome

Conditions of Abdominal Pain Syndrome

Inflammatory conditions of the upper abdomen:

Ulcer disease (duodenal ulcer, gastric ulcer)

Esophagitis (gastroesophageal reflux disease)

Gastritis (irritation of the lining of the stomach)

Pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas)

Cholecystitis (inflammation of the gall bladder)

Choledocholithiasis (passage of gall stones through the bile duct)

Hepatitis (infection or inflammation of the liver)

Colitis (infection or inflammation of the colon)

Functional problems of the abdomen:

Non-ulcer dyspepsia (discomfort after eating not due to ulcers)

Sphincter of Oddi dysfunction (problems with the bile duct valve)

Functional abdominal pain (pain without clear cause)

Irritable bowel syndrome (pain associated with bowel movements)

Cancers of the upper abdomen:

Hepatoma (liver cancer)

Cholangiocarcinoma (bile duct or gall bladder cancer)

Pancreatic cancer

Stomach cancer

Lymphoma (cancer of the immune cells)

Vascular problems:

Mesenteric vascular insufficiency (blocked arteries or veins)

Abdominal aortic aneurysm (swelling of the main artery in the belly)

Inflammatory conditions in the mid- and lower abdomen:

Enteritis (infections of the small bowel, Crohn’s disease)

Colitis (infection or inflammation of the colon)

Diverticulitis (inflammation of pouches that form in the colon)

Appendicitis

Bowel obstruction:

Adhesions (scars in the belly that form after surgery or inflammation)

Tumor

Inflammation

Colon Cancer

Understanding Your Heartburn

In fact, if left untreated, longstanding, severe and chronic heartburn has been linked with esophageal cancer. Don’t ignore frequent heartburn — instead consult with your physician regarding an endoscopy and treatment to achieve early symptom resolution.

If you suffer infrequent heartburn, antacids, or H2 blockers (now available without a prescription) or proton pump inhibitors (pending release at reduced strength over-the-counter dosages) may provide the relief you need.

If you are experiencing heartburn two or more times a week, you may have acid reflux disease, also known as GERD, which, if left untreated, is potentially serious.

If you are self-medicating for heartburn two or more times a week, or if you still have symptoms on your over-the-counter or prescription medication, you need to see a doctor and perhaps be referred to a gastroenterologist.

GERD has a physical cause that’s not your fault and can only be treated by a physician.

If left untreated, longstanding, severe and chronic heartburn/GERD has been linked with esophageal cancer. Don’t ignore frequent heartburn — instead consult with your physician regarding an endoscopy and treatment to achieve early symptom resolution.

GERD has a significant role in asthma, chronic cough and ear, nose and throat problems — all referred to as extra-esophageal manifestations (EEM) although this connection may often go unrecognized. GERD should be actively considered in physician evaluations of these conditions, or it could go undetected.

With effective treatment, using the range of prescription medications and other treatments available today, you can become symptom free, avoid potential complications and restore the quality of life you deserve.